'ccm' Tagged Posts

'ccm' Tagged Posts

Christian music festivals – a warning

Lifest is an annual 4-day Christian music festival that takes place in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, USA, each July. It attracts around 20,000 attendees per day and features around 100 artists performing on 6 different stages. It is a member of The Christian Festival Association, a group representing all the major Christian music festivals held in the United States and Canada, which are attended by a combined annual total of over 1 million people. The music served up at these festivals is ‘Contemporary Christian Music’ –…

Contemporary song books examined

In 1874, as a result of Ira Sankey’s much loved choice of hymns at D.L. Moody’s evangelistic crusades in the UK, the Sacred Songs and Solos hymnbook was born. 110 years later, in preparation for the 1984 visit to England of Billy Graham, a new hymnbook called Mission Praise was born. It was understandably strikingly different to ‘Sankeys’, but also to the hymn book used during Billy Graham’s first visit to England, only 31 years earlier. Between 1953 and 1984 the charismatic…

Examining contemporary praise and worship

Assessing contemporary praise and worship (CPW) is a tricky task for two major reasons. Firstly, the phenomenon is less than 70 years old, and secondly, it is a varied and constantly changing field of study. Yet, for all its variety, CPW exhibits four enduring features, which distinguish it from all that went before it, during 1,900 years of church history, namely: 1. New Actions: singing in tongues, dancing in the spirit, clapping and hand waving. 2. New Appointments: ‘worship leaders’, ‘worship teams’,…

The triumph of experience over truth in evangelicalism

Across vast swathes of evangelicalism, doctrine and theology have become dirty words. What “feels good” has won the day. Exposition has been surrendered to entertainment, preaching to performance, doctrine to drama, and theology to theatrics. Anyone questioning the “big band feel” of the contemporary church will soon discover that you can argue with a doctrine, but you can’t argue with an experience. With apologies to Decartes, “I feel, therefore I am” pretty neatly sums up where we are today, as…